Western Europe

A Peek Into Several European Countries

Spain and the Mediterranean Sea Pollution

med sea poll

By: Tiffany Murray

An environmental issue that Spain has been dealing with for several decades, and which is still a problem is the polluting of the Mediterranean Sea.  The pollution is caused by millions of tons of raw sewage being dumped into the Sea from the offshore production of oil and gas. The area is also a major route for oil transportation and tons of oil each year is leaked into the Sea by accidental spills. Many beaches in southern Europe, as well as North Africa experience high levels of bacteria due to the raw sewage being dumped into the Sea. Spain is working with other countries and the United Nations Environment Programme (ENEP) to try and work on solving this issue. In 1975, MAP (Mediterranean Action Plan) was designed with several main objectives. Two of the main objectives were to assist the Mediterranean countries in evaluating and restricting pollution, and to form national environment policies. In 1975 MAP Phase II was created, taking into account the weaknesses of the MAP. The main priorities of the MAP Phase II are: to bring about a tremendous reduction in pollution, to protect marine and coastal habitats, to restrict and intercede quickly on oil pollution and to promote sustainable development in the Mediterranean region. The MAP Phase II is still in effect today and will hopefully bring about a change in the pollution levels in the Mediterranean Sea.

http://www.eoearth.org/view/article/154548/

http://www.unepmap.org/index.php?module=content2&catid=001001002

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3 comments on “Spain and the Mediterranean Sea Pollution

  1. Monika Fischer
    September 15, 2013

    What is the EU’s role in the MAP phases?

  2. aharris0428
    October 1, 2013

    Are there other organizations trying to take part in helping Spain’s current situation?

  3. barrsarah
    October 2, 2013

    It’s a shame to see this level of blatant pollution. Perpetuated by certain companies, this is certainly a borderless issue. The Mediterranean Sea touches roughly 20 countries, and each of these will be affected. Because of these facts, I find it nothing short of imperative to have a global body involved in regulation and enforcement.

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This entry was posted on September 14, 2013 by in Spain.
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